Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Trivium Tuesdays - Classical Link-Up #130


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Welcome to another week of Trivium Tuesdays!  For those of you who are new here today, this is a link-up aimed at encouraging and informing other homeschoolers who use the Classical model of teaching.  Here we can share with each other and learn from one another.



Don't forget to follow my Pinterest boards that are a part of the All Things Classical List!

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Also, please remember to only link up posts that have to do with homeschooling using the classical model of education.  Thank you for understanding this link-up's theme.


Featured Post from Last Week



My kids and I have enjoyed All About Spelling, but we are only beginning level 2.  Tonia, from The Sunny Patch, shares a great look into the upper levels of the program and encourages us to stick with it!  If you are currently using AAS or are looking for a spelling curriculum, I encourage you to check out the post!


This Week's Link-Up


Here are the rules:
  • Your post must have to do (in some way) with classical homeschooling (any age children).
  • Your post may be from your archives as long as you only post it one time on this link-up.
  • Please link to your direct post, not your blog in general.
  • Please link back to this post in some way. You can use my Trivium Tuesdays button (found on my right sidebar) if you'd like so others can learn about this link-up! Button code: <a href="http://www.livingandlearningathome.com/" target="_blank" title="Trivium Tuesdays"><img alt="Living and Learning at Home" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ZNtNfqeG_W4/U0qj7mUZCfI/AAAAAAAAFbo/vhEStFGbogw/s1600/Trivium+Tuesdays+-+button.png"/></a>
  • It may be helpful to state in your link description what stage of the trivium or what subject your post is about, if applicable, so others can easily find posts they are interested in looking at.
  • Remember, everyone loves comments =) So don't be shy, and tell someone if you liked their post!


I reserve the right to remove any link-up that does not have to do with classical homeschooling.         

If you are a regular here at Trivium Tuesdays and have something to share that is a little off topic, but still would be an encouragement to the readers here, please still share it =)  I'm referring to people who are just trying to get their blog more exposure without following the rules above.

I will visit each of your blogs this week and feature my favorite link-up for all to see next week!  Also, if your blog has a button I will place it on my sidebar (under Friends to Visit) for the week until it is replaced by the next week's favorite =)


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Friday, October 17, 2014

The Liberal Arts Tradition - An Introduction

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This post contains an affiliate link to the book we are discussing.

Oh, how I am excited to be starting the discussion of The Liberal Arts Tradition!  Why am I so excited?  It is because in the past six months I feel like my eyes are being opened to a greater understanding of classical education, but I know that I still have so much more to learn.  This book is going to help me (and you, hopefully!) gain some of that knowledge.


What is Classical Education?


If you were to ask me a year or two about what classical education is, I would have started talking about the trivium.  Most people I have talked to equate the trivium with classical education.  I am learning that the trivium is only a small (none the less vital) part of what classical education is.  Here is a diagram I made to show you what I mean:




Now, am I saying that the above diagram is complete?  No.   Am I missing other aspects of classical education?  Probably.  Am I  an all-knowing expert on this issue?  Absolutely not!  What I hope this diagram does is help you to see that the Trivium is just a small part of classical education.  It is an important part, but it is not enough.  That is something that I am just learning.  Won't you learn along with me?


This book seeks to present "a vision of the liberal arts as a central part of a larger and more robust paradigm of Christian classical education." (pg. 2)


The Six Curricular Categories of Classical Education


The first chapter is an introduction to the book and explains a little about each of these other spheres of classical education.  This was all new to me, so let me briefly explain them:

  • Piety - The proper love and fear of God and man.

  • Theology - The science of Scripture.

  • Gymnastic - Training the body and mind to have the virtue of an athlete.

  • Music - An education in wonder.

  • The Liberal Arts -  The seven skills encompassed in the Trivium and Quadrivium.

  • Philosophy -  The love of wisdom and the unity of knowledge in natural, moral, and divine reality.

Some of these words are defined differently than we are used to in our modern vernacular.  We are creating new categories of thinking, friends!   I am excited to learn more about each of these things.  Starting next Friday we will take one of these aspects of classical education per week and dive deeper into it.

This week I want to leave you with a passage that Dr. Perrin wrote in the "Note from the Publisher."  I think it is a beautiful description of how classical education is being rediscovered.

In the reading of dozens of books on classical education, I often experience the exercise in a kind of dream state.  I find myself catching glimpses of things that I know are a part of a great whole, as if I once knew that whole but can't quite remember it.  When another book restores some great part of that whole, I put that part into place with a flash of recognition---as it fits into place I recognize that I once knew it.




Have you gotten The Liberal Arts Tradition Yet?

 

What are your thoughts on this bigger picture of classical education? 






Thanks for reading along this week!  What did you think of this chapter?  Leave comments here on the blog post, or share about it on social media (#ClassicalMamasRead).  I'll be sharing too, so follow me on facebook, twitter, or google+ and we can chat about it there as well!  Don't forget, if you want to share your thoughts about Home Education on your own blog, link it up below so we can all come and visit!

Next week we will look at the subject of Piety in The Liberal Arts Tradition.  If you haven't gotten your own copy yet, make sure you grab a copy so you can join in on our discussions soon!



Classical Mamas Read Link-Up



Did you write about The Liberal Arts Tradition on your blog?  Have you been reading and blogging about another book (for you, not a children's book)?  Do you have a book club going on at your blog (once again, not for a children's book)?  I'd love for you link up here so we can all be encouraged by each other and maybe find another great book to read!

I'm going to keep this link-up ongoing since there aren't going to be a huge number of posts and then anyone new will be able to be encouraged by the other book reading ideas and discussions.  If the number of posts gets too large, I will fix it.

Please note, all posts must be on topic (about a book you are reading) and appropriate (think family friendly).

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Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Trivium Tuesdays - Classical Link-Up #129


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Welcome to another week of Trivium Tuesdays!  For those of you who are new here today, this is a link-up aimed at encouraging and informing other homeschoolers who use the Classical model of teaching.  Here we can share with each other and learn from one another.



Don't forget to follow my Pinterest boards that are a part of the All Things Classical List!

 photo AllThingsClassical-titlepic_zps4a3485e7.png

Also, please remember to only link up posts that have to do with homeschooling using the classical model of education.  Thank you for understanding this link-up's theme.



Featured Post from Last Week



Classical Education is Life Education. I really enjoyed the sentiment of this post. Some people think of classical education as being irrelevant, old, and well, dead. This post from Blessed Learners helps us remember why the classical principles are so important and relevant for today!


Your Favorite from Last Week


It seems like most classical homeschoolers are curious about CC.  I'm still curious even though we are a part of it this year!  Now wonder the post, Our Journey in CC, from Moms Teaching Olives was the most clicked last week.


This Week's Link-Up


Here are the rules:
  • Your post must have to do (in some way) with classical homeschooling (any age children).
  • Your post may be from your archives as long as you only post it one time on this link-up.
  • Please link to your direct post, not your blog in general.
  • Please link back to this post in some way. You can use my Trivium Tuesdays button (found on my right sidebar) if you'd like so others can learn about this link-up! Button code: <a href="http://www.livingandlearningathome.com/" target="_blank" title="Trivium Tuesdays"><img alt="Living and Learning at Home" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ZNtNfqeG_W4/U0qj7mUZCfI/AAAAAAAAFbo/vhEStFGbogw/s1600/Trivium+Tuesdays+-+button.png"/></a>
  • It may be helpful to state in your link description what stage of the trivium or what subject your post is about, if applicable, so others can easily find posts they are interested in looking at.
  • Remember, everyone loves comments =) So don't be shy, and tell someone if you liked their post!


I reserve the right to remove any link-up that does not have to do with classical homeschooling.         

If you are a regular here at Trivium Tuesdays and have something to share that is a little off topic, but still would be an encouragement to the readers here, please still share it =)  I'm referring to people who are just trying to get their blog more exposure without following the rules above.

I will visit each of your blogs this week and feature my favorite link-up for all to see next week!  Also, if your blog has a button I will place it on my sidebar (under Friends to Visit) for the week until it is replaced by the next week's favorite =)


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Monday, October 13, 2014

Lessons in Scholé

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This post contains affiliate links to highly recommended resources!

Today I am excited to have Bonnie, from Moms Teaching Olives, here to talk about some of the lessons she has learned while implementing restful learning in her homeschool.

This year my first grader is really thriving, learning and growing as we implement out Well-Trained Mind Classical Curriculum (you can read about our curriculum at Choosing Classical).  We are having SO much fun, and I'm relieved to find a new joy and vigor this year as opposed to the total overwhelming chaos I felt last year (for every time there is a season).  As out year is underway we're learning a new but important lesson: schooling with scholé.

During Amy's series, Scholé Everyday, I focused on applying scholé to our school.  Here are some practical things we focused on this month and things that I need to more genuinely incorporate in our daily school/home life.  As Dr. Perrin says, "do things that will provide blessings, no just things that have economic value."  If you haven't found out by now, I'm a type A schedule person who is trapped in a life of chaos that I'm constantly trying to conquer.  These lessons in practical scholé will tell all =)

Get Outside


This might sound 'hippy' but communicating with nature is inherently restful.  Being outdoors refreshes the spirit and the physical body.  I was surprised that schooling outside does the same.  Content that is arduous (and perhaps - dare I say, boring?) when done inside, suddenly becomes new and exciting with just a simple change in scenery!  We found on our adventures outdoors, that schooling outside also allowed for FUN breaks.  We had a lot of fun playing and getting our energy out - surely that 'leisure ' could be part of what Dr. Perrin is talking about.  Read more about our Day of Rest, Not Stress and schooling outside.



Discuss Great Art (Masters)


As an Art History major myself, I LOVE the art greats; probably the neoclassic, impressionists, and romantics the best.  I was surprised when out First Language Lessons grammar curriculum had a lesson in part evaluation where the student was asked several questions and had to analyze a painting.  While I chose not to include art history in out curriculum this year so that out schedule wasn't burdened, my journey in scholé is opening my eyes to how we can more simply incorporate it.  We aren't adding it into our schedule, but each week we are viewing a print (you can view great ones at the National Gallery of Art website) and spending time discussing it.

Scholé is a more comprehensive incorporation of liberal arts and the philosophy of discussion and analysis, and I hope our art discussions will prompt higher level conversation regarding the arts.


Listen to Classical Music


As an educator, and really even as a student myself, I often hear routed the cerebral benefits of listening to classical music.  This "Mozart Effect" (which gained a lot of momentum in the 90's) has had a lot of research and debate about classical music and its effects on children's brains.  Whether you agree with the research or not, the principle of listening to classical music for rest is something else entirely.  It is choosing to intently focus on music and really incorporate it into your routine - ours happens at the breakfast table.

I'll be the first to admit that when I was reading about the benefits of classical music, I actually had to cringe at my own dislike for it and I wasn't sure whether I should 'force myself' to listen to it.  Thank goodness for Mary at Homegrown Learners and her SQUILT lessons (Super Quiet Uninterrupted Listening Time).  While my kiddos are too young to really enjoy the benefits of her curriculum, the concept has been well embraced.  These peaceful moments where attention is focused on the music and we really just rest, have become a welcome time in out morning routine.


Visit the Library (not because you have something to get)


Let's get real, I have 4 kids and while out library is honestly AWESOME, we don't go there just for the sake of going.  I strategically plan out monthly (or often bi-monthly) trips based on upcoming subjects and lessons so that we can choose out books on whatever topics relate to our curriculum.  Scholé opened my eyes to the fact that there is SO much learning that can go on at the library, and not just learning how to functionally use the library (which my first grader is starting to master), but engaging in books and having 'leisure' time while we are there.  Not rushing to gather out materials for the next few weeks, but just allowing kids to pick out their own books on whatever they find interesting.

Choosing to enjoy our time there, not being less productive, but allowing less purpose as we peruse and enjoy books there.  After all, I want to develop a LOVE for books, not squash our interests with a schedule.


Decorate Something (art, flowers, a seasonal vignette etc.)


Part of scholé is developing an atmosphere in your home that is conducive to learning and contemplative discussion.  While art, flowers, or seasonal items can seem unnecessary, even superfluous, their intent is to create a calm, enjoyable environment and to promote peacefulness in your home.

Let me tell you the truth, the challenge I placed on myself for a fall vignette meant more than developing a peaceful place, it required de-cluttering enough to put one out --- ouch, sometimes the truth hurts!  My own disorganization sometimes frustrates me (does that happen to you?)  I realized that before I needed flowers, I needed a clear visual space.  So, I gave myself a week long challenge to keep ALL my kitchen counters clear - WOW that was convicting!  It worked though, and I rewarded myself with a fall vignette which makes me feel like one of those 'together moms' who I try not to compare myself to. =)


What's Next ...


As I work to learn and develop the skill of 'doing' leisure and applying scholé to our school, my next step is reading Teaching from Rest: A Homeschooler's Guide to Unshakeable Peace.  Have you read it?  How are you using these ideas to incorporate restful learning into your homeschool?





Bonnie is a Christ-Follower and a wife and mom to four children with many names: helpmate, homemaker and homeschooler.  Along with her best friend, Bethany, they co-author the blog Moms Teaching Olives. They are two families with one calling, encouraged by Psalm 128:3 to classically teach their children at home! Following their Well Trained Mind approach can help you learn about classical education and the life of two very different moms and two very different families who both seek (and sometimes struggle) to follow their true calling as moms and teachers.




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Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Trivium Tuesdays - Classical Link-Up #128


Pin It

Welcome to another week of Trivium Tuesdays!  For those of you who are new here today, this is a link-up aimed at encouraging and informing other homeschoolers who use the Classical model of teaching.  Here we can share with each other and learn from one another.



Don't forget to follow my Pinterest boards that are a part of the All Things Classical List!

 photo AllThingsClassical-titlepic_zps4a3485e7.png

Also, please remember to only link up posts that have to do with homeschooling using the classical model of education.  Thank you for understanding this link-up's theme.



Featured Post from Last Week



I loved this post from Tonia at The Sunny Patch.  I am a firm believer in lots of reading for kids, but completely understand that not every kid is naturally inclined to love reading for hours each day =)  Tonia gives wonderful ideas for encouraging reading whether your child is 'bookisih' or not!  There are some great ideas in the comments as well, so make sure to read all the way down!


This Week's Link-Up


Here are the rules:
  • Your post must have to do (in some way) with classical homeschooling (any age children).
  • Your post may be from your archives as long as you only post it one time on this link-up.
  • Please link to your direct post, not your blog in general.
  • Please link back to this post in some way. You can use my Trivium Tuesdays button (found on my right sidebar) if you'd like so others can learn about this link-up! Button code: <a href="http://www.livingandlearningathome.com/" target="_blank" title="Trivium Tuesdays"><img alt="Living and Learning at Home" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ZNtNfqeG_W4/U0qj7mUZCfI/AAAAAAAAFbo/vhEStFGbogw/s1600/Trivium+Tuesdays+-+button.png"/></a>
  • It may be helpful to state in your link description what stage of the trivium or what subject your post is about, if applicable, so others can easily find posts they are interested in looking at.
  • Remember, everyone loves comments =) So don't be shy, and tell someone if you liked their post!


I reserve the right to remove any link-up that does not have to do with classical homeschooling.         

If you are a regular here at Trivium Tuesdays and have something to share that is a little off topic, but still would be an encouragement to the readers here, please still share it =)  I'm referring to people who are just trying to get their blog more exposure without following the rules above.

I will visit each of your blogs this week and feature my favorite link-up for all to see next week!  Also, if your blog has a button I will place it on my sidebar (under Friends to Visit) for the week until it is replaced by the next week's favorite =)


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