Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Trivium Tuesdays - Classical Link-Up #138


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Welcome to another week of Trivium Tuesdays!  For those of you who are new here today, this is a link-up aimed at encouraging and informing other homeschoolers who use the Classical model of teaching.  Here we can share with each other and learn from one another.



Don't forget to follow my Pinterest boards that are a part of the All Things Classical List!

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Also, please remember to only link up posts that have to do with homeschooling using the classical model of education.  Thank you for understanding this link-up's theme.


Featured Post from Last Week



I am excited to announce that Trivium Tuesdays now has a co-host!  Please join me in welcoming Sara from Classical Homeschooling.  She will now also be visiting your posts and helping to share your great content!  In honor of this, I am going to feature her post about ScholĂ© this week =) Make sure you stop over there and welcome her!


This Week's Link-Up


Here are the rules:
  • Your post must have to do (in some way) with classical homeschooling (any age children).
  • Your post may be from your archives as long as you only post it one time on this link-up.
  • Please link to your direct post, not your blog in general.
  • Please link back to this post in some way. You can use my Trivium Tuesdays button (found on my right sidebar) if you'd like so others can learn about this link-up! Button code: <a href="http://www.livingandlearningathome.com/" target="_blank" title="Trivium Tuesdays"><img alt="Living and Learning at Home" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ZNtNfqeG_W4/U0qj7mUZCfI/AAAAAAAAFbo/vhEStFGbogw/s1600/Trivium+Tuesdays+-+button.png"/></a>
  • It may be helpful to state in your link description what stage of the trivium or what subject your post is about, if applicable, so others can easily find posts they are interested in looking at.
  • Remember, everyone loves comments =) So don't be shy, and tell someone if you liked their post!


I reserve the right to remove any link-up that does not have to do with classical homeschooling.         

If you are a regular here at Trivium Tuesdays and have something to share that is a little off topic, but still would be an encouragement to the readers here, please still share it =)  I'm referring to people who are just trying to get their blog more exposure without following the rules above.

I will visit each of your blogs this week and feature my favorite link-up for all to see next week!  Also, if your blog has a button I will place it on my sidebar (under Friends to Visit) for the week until it is replaced by the next week's favorite =)


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Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Simply Fun Giveaway - Trivium Tuesdays #137


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Welcome to another week of Trivium Tuesdays!  For those of you who are new here today, this is a link-up aimed at encouraging and informing other homeschoolers who use the Classical model of teaching.  Here we can share with each other and learn from one another.


Also, please remember to only link up posts that have to do with homeschooling using the classical model of education.  Thank you for understanding this link-up's theme.

Simply Fun Giveaway!


Did you happen to catch my post, Games for Boys who Like to Think, from a couple weeks ago?  One of the games that I recommended was Betcha Can't Win from Simply Fun.  I am excited to be able to give you the chance to get your own game for free!  Betcha CAN win ;)

I received this game recently from Simply Fun and it was an instant hit!  My favorite part?  It comes with 24 beautiful dice =)  I'm not sure why I like that so much.  In this game, each person rolls all 6 of their dice and tries to add the numbers up to match numbers on the card.  There is strategy involved because you can steal cards from other players and you can split your dice by putting some on one card and some on another.  My son asks to play this all the time.  I like that you could also tweak the rules and have your child use other math operations (like multiplication or subtraction) to make the game more difficult as your child grows.  Highly recommended!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Featured Post from Last Week


I know everyone's minds are on Christmas and all the related festivities of this time of year.  Many of you linked up these types of posts last week and I enjoyed reading them!  Even so, the most clicked post from last week wasn't holiday related at all.  It is my feature for this week.  Tonia, from The Sunny Patch, shares how her daughter is using the Logic Stage level of Harmony Fine Arts.  If you have a middle grades child, check it out!

Harmony Fine Arts is a sponsor here, and whatever age child you have, I recommend checking out the rest of what they have to offer!


This Week's Link-Up


Here are the rules:
  • Your post must have to do (in some way) with classical homeschooling (any age children).
  • Your post may be from your archives as long as you only post it one time on this link-up.
  • Please link to your direct post, not your blog in general.
  • Please link back to this post in some way. You can use my Trivium Tuesdays button (found on my right sidebar) if you'd like so others can learn about this link-up! Button code: <a href="http://www.livingandlearningathome.com/" target="_blank" title="Trivium Tuesdays"><img alt="Living and Learning at Home" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ZNtNfqeG_W4/U0qj7mUZCfI/AAAAAAAAFbo/vhEStFGbogw/s1600/Trivium+Tuesdays+-+button.png"/></a>
  • It may be helpful to state in your link description what stage of the trivium or what subject your post is about, if applicable, so others can easily find posts they are interested in looking at.
  • Remember, everyone loves comments =) So don't be shy, and tell someone if you liked their post!


I reserve the right to remove any link-up that does not have to do with classical homeschooling.         

If you are a regular here at Trivium Tuesdays and have something to share that is a little off topic, but still would be an encouragement to the readers here, please still share it =)  I'm referring to people who are just trying to get their blog more exposure without following the rules above.

I will visit each of your blogs this week and feature my favorite link-up for all to see next week!  Also, if your blog has a button I will place it on my sidebar (under Friends to Visit) for the week until it is replaced by the next week's favorite =)


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Monday, December 8, 2014

Teacher Tips for Managing Children


This is a sponsored post by Gintare from Chameleon John.  This topic is very helpful to me right now.  I am teaching in a Classical Conversations class this year and I quickly realized how difficult managing a group of kids is!  As homeschoolers, we do not always have to deal with managing classroom settings, but I'm sure many of you have led a co-op class at some point, or will in the future.  I hope this post will be helpful to you!

As a mommy, the task is to take care of one, two or more kids. Even though some families have many children, families are typically not as large as classroom full of kids!  As a teacher, you have to consider a number of things, which can be really hard. This post is about helping teachers discipline kids and, at the same time, be sure that the kids are happy in the classroom.

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Check that tone 


Teachers often think that they should raise their voice if kids are not listening to them. However, instead of raising their voice, they should lower it. By lowering your voice, you are forcing kids to listen to you. Be creative and whisper something like this – If you can hear me, close your eyes!


Plan your day 


If you can plan your day, you can try your best to keep a track of your kids in the classroom. Need a plan book? Check out ChameleonJohn coupons for overstock.com and get a couple of them.


Give the children a ‘daily’ task for holidays 


With school breaks, kids love to play, play and play. If you can, give them a task that needs to be carried out on a daily basis. Let their parents know about it. This is important because, for example, if they are not in the habit of writing during school breaks, it will be difficult for them when they get back to school. To encourage them, give them a simple pencil, but call it a ‘special’ one. Tell them a little story about it and give it to them. If you are planning to buy these pencils, you might enjoy an amazing discount on your purchases with the help of this coupon for overstock.com.


Post lunch issues 


Children love to relax after lunch. This means that their focus will not be entirely on the subject at hand. A simple trick that can be used here is, dim the classroom lights. This will help students to refocus and calm down.


Ask kids to give their opinion


Kids love to know that they are in control of their tasks. This will help them to get back to work and, at the same time, they are less likely to complain. So, ask them for their options and if it is acceptable, let them go ahead with it.


The complain box 


Most kids are okay with the tasks given to them. So only a few constitute of the 'troublemakers.' If they don’t like a particular task, they will complain about it. Give them a complete minute to complain about it and then ask them to get back to their task. Maybe allow them to write down their complaint and put it into a special 'complaint box.'


The ‘gift’ idea 


Kids love gifts. Every day, before the class starts, make an announcement that the best-behaved kids will get a gift at the end of the day. This trick will work on most of the kids in the classroom. So, use it and have a great day. Need little gifts for the kids? Here are some inspiring ideas for you. Have a look at it and use these overstock promo codes to make your deal cheaper.



Have you taught in a classroom setting before?


What do you think of these tips?  


What ideas did you use for classroom management?





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Friday, December 5, 2014

Liberal Arts: The Trivium

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This post contains an affiliate link to the book we are discussing.

Oh, how I am excited to be discussing The Liberal Arts Tradition with you!  Why am I so excited?  It is because in the past six months I feel like my eyes are being opened to a greater understanding of classical education, but I know that I still have so much more to learn.  This book is going to help me (and you, hopefully!) gain some of that knowledge.

I hope all my American readers had a nice Thanksgiving!  I took a couple of week off from doing much blogging, but I am ready to get back into discussing this next chapter with you!

Hopefully we will get to a couple chapters before taking another small break for Christmas.  So let's get started talking about the seven liberal arts!

The Trivium


If you asked any classical homeschooler to define classical education, you would undoubtedly get an answer that revolves around the trivium.  Up until about a year ago, that is all I thought it was too!  While it is not the entirety of classical education, it is certainly one very important component.  In case you are not already familiar with the trivium, let me share with you the definition found on page 35 of The Liberal Arts Tradition:

"Latin for the three ways, the Trivium is the threefold curriculum of the language arts: grammar, dialectic, and rhetoric.  In their most basic sense, grammar has to do with understanding language, dialectic with dialogic reasoning, and rhetoric with the artful composition of texts, written and spoken."


Grammar


Typically we think of grammar as being a time where young elementary students soak up all the basic information they can about a wide variety of subjects.  This is because of the essay, The Lost Tools of Learning, that Dorothy Sayers wrote in the 1940s.  She likened the idea of grammar to the natural way that students learn when they are young, and gave birth to the idea of the grammar stage.

Did you know that a grammar stage is not something that was a part of the original classical tradition?

"Historically, then, the "grammar" of grammar was not merely an abstract concept meaning "to learn the rudiments of all the subjects."  Rather, it meant learning Latin...This fact has been overlooked by many in the Christian classical renewal, but it is very important to keep in mind."

 Interesting!  So, I think it is good to keep in mind that while memory work is good and necessary, being able to read original works is really what we are after.



Dialectic


This subject of the trivium is often called Logic because it has to do with the art of reasoning.  The book points out, though, that it is more than logic.  From the root of the word dialectic, we can tell that the subject also involved dialogue.

Our children need to learn to ask good questions, sort and reason through information, and process it all into good answers.  On page 41 the book states that dialectic skill is necessary for further studies, but must be 'perfected' first:

The art of dialectic, therefore, will ultimately be an invaluable resource for study of the sciences and philosophies, but it must first be perfected by rhetoric.


Rhetoric


This chapter spends a good amount of space discussing rhetoric.  Rhetoric is always interesting to me because I'm just not there yet!  It is like some illusive end goal that seems so far away.

Essentially Rhetoric is the art of eloquence.  We want our students to learn to be well spoken and persuasive.  Of course in the Christian tradition we want them to do this for the glory of God and not for the sake of their own ego.




How are you doing at implementing the three liberal arts of the trivium in your homeschool?  


Does your chosen curriculum reflect the goals of these arts?  


Are you a part of a classical school, co-op, or other formal gathering?  How do their goals line up with this facet of classical education?  







Thanks for reading along this week!  What did you think of this chapter?  Leave comments here on the blog post, or share about it on social media (#ClassicalMamasRead).  I'll be sharing too, so follow me on facebook, twitter, or google+ and we can chat about it there as well!  Don't forget, if you want to share your thoughts about Home Education on your own blog, link it up below so we can all come and visit!

Next time we will look at the trivium in The Liberal Arts Tradition.  If you haven't gotten your own copy yet, make sure you grab a copy so you can join in on our discussions soon!



Classical Mamas Read Link-Up



Did you write about The Liberal Arts Tradition on your blog?  Have you been reading and blogging about another book (for you, not a children's book)?  Do you have a book club going on at your blog (once again, not for a children's book)?  I'd love for you link up here so we can all be encouraged by each other and maybe find another great book to read!

I'm going to keep this link-up ongoing since there aren't going to be a huge number of posts and then anyone new will be able to be encouraged by the other book reading ideas and discussions.  If the number of posts gets too large, I will fix it.

Please note, all posts must be on topic (about a book you are reading) and appropriate (think family friendly).

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Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Trivium Tuesdays - Classical Link-Up #135


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Welcome to another week of Trivium Tuesdays!  For those of you who are new here today, this is a link-up aimed at encouraging and informing other homeschoolers who use the Classical model of teaching.  Here we can share with each other and learn from one another.



Don't forget to follow my Pinterest boards that are a part of the All Things Classical List!

 photo AllThingsClassical-titlepic_zps4a3485e7.png

Also, please remember to only link up posts that have to do with homeschooling using the classical model of education.  Thank you for understanding this link-up's theme.


Featured Post from Last Week




I've been thinking a lot about literature lately, so this post from Aspired Living caught my eye!  She recommends Teaching the Classics, which I've been trying to find out more about.  I'd love to hear your opinion if you've used it or another Literature program/guide that you enjoy!


This Week's Link-Up


Here are the rules:
  • Your post must have to do (in some way) with classical homeschooling (any age children).
  • Your post may be from your archives as long as you only post it one time on this link-up.
  • Please link to your direct post, not your blog in general.
  • Please link back to this post in some way. You can use my Trivium Tuesdays button (found on my right sidebar) if you'd like so others can learn about this link-up! Button code: <a href="http://www.livingandlearningathome.com/" target="_blank" title="Trivium Tuesdays"><img alt="Living and Learning at Home" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ZNtNfqeG_W4/U0qj7mUZCfI/AAAAAAAAFbo/vhEStFGbogw/s1600/Trivium+Tuesdays+-+button.png"/></a>
  • It may be helpful to state in your link description what stage of the trivium or what subject your post is about, if applicable, so others can easily find posts they are interested in looking at.
  • Remember, everyone loves comments =) So don't be shy, and tell someone if you liked their post!


I reserve the right to remove any link-up that does not have to do with classical homeschooling.         

If you are a regular here at Trivium Tuesdays and have something to share that is a little off topic, but still would be an encouragement to the readers here, please still share it =)  I'm referring to people who are just trying to get their blog more exposure without following the rules above.

I will visit each of your blogs this week and feature my favorite link-up for all to see next week!  Also, if your blog has a button I will place it on my sidebar (under Friends to Visit) for the week until it is replaced by the next week's favorite =)


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