Friday, August 30, 2013

Classical Mamas Read - The Well Trained Mind Ch. 17-18

Pin It

This post contains affiliate links to highly recommended products!

Welcome back to Classical Mamas Read!  I'm excited to be back here with you today to discuss chapters 17 and 18 of The Well Trained MindIf you want to take a look back at our previous discussions, click the picture above to take you to a list of each chapter we have talked about.

Today we are going to be talking about Logic stage English and Science.  While I highlight the main points in the chapters, and bring up questions as well as things that are interesting to me, I can't recommend to you enough to get the book for yourself.  It is over 800 pages and is filled with details and recommendations that I cannot even begin to touch on here!


Ch. 17 - Thinking Straight: Spelling, Grammar, Reading, and Writing (logic stage)

 

  • In the logic stage, students shift from simply absorbing facts to having to analyze them.

  • Similarly, instead of just memorizing the rules, they will start to see how language fits together.

Grammar Stage -----> Logic Stage

Spelling -----> Word Study
Grammar -----> How parts of speech are put together
Reading -----> The why and the how of the story
Writing -----> Longer writing, essays, and good stories


  • Spelling
    •  Begin teaching them the roots of words.

  • Grammar
    • Learn to diagram
 
Diagramming prevents the child from simply parroting back rules that she doesn't fully understand.   (pg. 340)

The study of grammar has as its goal the creation of a clear, persuasive, forceful, fully equipped speaker and writer.   (pg. 340)


What grammar resources and curriculum do you use to teach your logic stage student?


  • Align your students extra reading with what they are learning in history.

    • Create narration pages and book reports.
    •  Increase the reading of primary sources.
    • Read the book yourself so you can discuss it with your child.

  • Have your child memorize a few poems or passages from their reading each year.

Do you use a separate writing program?  If so, what is it?



Ch. 18 - Making Deductions: Science (logic stage)


  • The logic student takes their grammar stage science discoveries to the next level.

{Your goal in the logic stage} is to teach the young student to think critically about doing science. (pg. 383)

  • You will guide your child in the scientific method:
    1.  State the question.
    2. Form a hypothesis.
    3. Test the hypothesis through experimentation.
    4. Draw conclusions.

  • After the experiment, your child should record their findings and then read more about them.

  • They recommend spending an hour and a half on science two days a week.

    • Day 1: Reading about the topic, experimentation, and recording the results.
    • Day 2: Making a report, recording dates, and making a sketch.

  • They recommend keeping all of this info in a notebook (look in the book for much more detail about this). 

  •  Don't forget to take field trips!

Do you follow a certain curriculum for science?


 ______________________________________________________________________________


If you don't have the book already, you can look for it at your library or get it on amazon. (The Well Trained Mind)

If you are behind, feel free to still comment on the previous discussions.  If you want to be emailed when someone makes a comment, make sure to click "Subscribe by Email" right under the comment box (right hand side), so you won't miss out on any discussion!


Classical Mamas Read Link-Up


Did you write about these chapters on your blog?  Have you been reading and blogging about another book (for you, not a children's book)?  Do you have a book club going on at your blog (once again, not for a children's book)?  I'd love for you link up here so we can all be encouraged by each other and maybe find another great book to read!

I think I'm going to keep this link-up ongoing since there aren't going to be a huge number of posts and then anyone new will be able to be encouraged by the other book reading ideas and discussions.  If the number of posts gets too large, I will fix it.

Please note, all posts must be on topic (about a book you are reading) and appropriate (think family friendly).

 photo SubscribeButton_zpsdc17ac56.png

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Trivium Tuesdays-Classical Link-Up #72

Pin It



Welcome to another week of Trivium Tuesdays!  For those of you who are new here today, this is a link-up aimed at encouraging and informing other homeschoolers who use the Classical model of teaching.  Here we can share with each other and learn from one another.

I'm still working on transferring the All Things Classical list over to Pinterest.  If you don't follow me over there already, make sure you do so that you can search the boards to find just what you need!  Click on the "P" to follow!


Featured Post




How do you organize your book shelves?  Laurie from Teacups in the Garden has a wonderful system, especially wonderful for us classical homeschoolers!  She lines up her books like a timeline.  How amazing would it be to have your books ready to go at any time, just reaching for the next one in line?  You can read all about it in her post Seeing Dots: Homeschool Book and DVD Organization. 


Most Clicked on Post


The most clicked on link from last week was Beth's Memory Work System Review & Giveaway.  Unfortunately the giveaway is now over, (hopefully you clicked on it and entered last week!) but if you are a part of Classical Conversations, you are going to want to make sure to check out this great resource!


This Week's Link-Up


Here are the rules:
  • Your post must have to do (in some way) with classical homeschooling (any age children).
  • Your post may be from your archives as long as you only post it one time on this link-up.
  • Please link to your direct post, not your blog in general.
  • Please place my Trivium Tuesdays button (found on my right sidebar) on your blog post so others can learn about this link-up!
  • It may be helpful to state in your link description what stage of the trivium or what subject your post is about, if applicable, so others can easily find posts they are interested in looking at.
  • Remember, everyone loves comments =) So don't be shy, and tell someone if you liked their post!

I reserve the right to remove any link-up that does not have to do with classical homeschooling.         If you are a regular here at Trivium Tuesdays and have something to share that is a little off topic, but still would be an encouragement to the readers here, please still share it =)  I'm referring to people who are just trying to get their blog more exposure without following the rules above.

I will visit each of your blogs this week and feature my favorite link-up for all to see next week!  Also, if your blog has a button I will place it on my sidebar (under Friends to Visit) for the week until it is replaced by the next week's favorite =)

 photo SubscribeButton_zpsdc17ac56.png

Monday, August 26, 2013

How we Schedule our Classical Homeschool Day

Pin It

This year I'm changing things up a bit.

Last year, my aim was to get school done in the morning and then have the afternoons free for the kids to play.  Sounds reasonable, right?  Well, I found that a few things happened:

  • School dragged on right until lunch because my son has a habit of dilly-dallying.

  • I was neglecting the housework because I just can't seem to handle more than one thing at a time =)  We would either have a clean house or a good homeschool day!

  • The 'extra' fun subjects like music, art, etc. weren't happening because it took too long just doing the basics (dilly-dallying again)

  • The fun play time that I envisioned with the kids in the afternoon never really happened because they have nap/rest time from 1-3pm and after that I was always scrambling to get dinner made and the house picked up.

I knew that there had to be a better way.  A new idea hit me just a few weeks ago and I'm excited to try it out! I'm going to split our school day between the morning and afternoon (which I had never before thought of for young children).  That way there is purposeful time each morning for housework (me) and play (kids).

I am a ducks-in-a-row kind of girl, so the hardest thing for me is accounting for variables like visits to grandparents, co-ops, and extra curricular type lessons.  After a ton of (over?)thinking and a full page chart, I think I have it figured out!


Morning Time


8:00-9:00am -
  • Breakfast
  • Review memory work
  • Read (History or Science depending on the day)
  • Notebook page (History or Science depending on the day)

Something that I loved from last year was reading to the kids while they ate breakfast.  It keeps them focused on sitting at the table and eating and also saves time.  I usually would read to them for about a half hour from a living history book, which my son loved, and then review things from our memory box.  I'm planning on keeping that the same this year, with the exception of alternating history and science days.


Get Ready Time


9:00-9:30am -
  • Get dressed
  • Make bed
  • Tidy room
  • Brush teeth
  • Chore (with the option of an extra chore to earn a coin)

We worked on getting those first four items down to a habit last year.  The kids can say them without even thinking .  Sometimes now, my son will come find me in the morning and tell me that he's already done them.  Yeah!  The thing I always need to work on is being more consistent in making them do a chore every day.


Play Time


9:30-10:00am -
  • Completely free play time (kids)
  • Dedicated clean the house time (mom)

This is what is new this year.  Previously we had jumped right into school after getting ready, but this year I'm going to try letting the kids play so I can do basic housework.  I always get stressed when the house is crazy, but also never saw the time to fix it up.  I'm hoping that this half hour each morning will help create peace for the rest of the day.


Extra Time


10:00am-12:00pm -

  • Mondays - gymnastics lessons (swimming later this year)
  • Thursdays - visit to my parents
  • Fridays - once a month co-op
  • Days we don't have anything scheduled: mom play with kids (puzzles, games, etc., music time, art lessons and appreciation, extra history projects, etc.

This is also new this year.  Yes, we did things like visit grandparents and have lessons before, but I always felt like they 'messed up' our school day (I just really like to follow plans =)  This year I've got time scheduled in the plan for them!  I really think this will work well, setting my mind at ease and also allowing for more fun  in the morning!

This is also where we can solve the problem of not having time for those extra, fun subjects!  My kids are always asking for them, and now we will have the time.  Doing an extra history project or an art lesson is just as fun for my kids as playing a game, so it's not like those things would be eating into their 'fun' time.


Lunch and Rest Time


12:00-3:00pm -
  • Eat lunch
  • Read aloud before nap/rest time
  • Nap time for my daughter, rest/read time for my son, blog time for me!

This is a pretty well established pattern already.  My son loves our reading time before his rest time.  Right now we have been reading (affiliate link) "Little House" books.  Some times my daughter joins in.  Other times she goes straight to sleep.  I hope to include her more this year, especially as her need for a nap decreases (she is 3 1/2).

This part of the plan will only change a little on days that we visit my parents or have co-op.  We will eat lunch with my parents and at (once a month) Friday co-op, so usually we get home a little after 1pm and rush to naps, cutting out the read aloud time.

Twice a month we have an afternoon co-op which will mean that we will not get nap/rest time at all.  I'm a little nervous about this, but we are giving it a shot because it's a great chance to get to know people at our new church better!


School Time


3:00-4:00pm -
  • Math
  • Language arts (grammar, spelling, reading, copywork, etc.)

This is a huge change for us.  We've never even thought of doing lessons in the afternoon before.  I'm hoping that everyone will be fresh from rest/nap time and ready to do a little more work!

Mackenzie will be having reading lessons and writing practice.  She also will do  basic math for the first time!  Trevor will also do math and work on grammar and spelling, etc.

While I am helping them will their lessons, hopefully I'll be able to also work on getting dinner ready and any last minute housework before my husband comes home.

If we (mostly my son) can be diligent and stay focused, and get that done in an hour, then there will be time left again for playing before daddy gets home.  While the weather is still nice, I'm sure the kids will use this time to play and ride their bikes outside!



In case you missed it before, check out who theses kids are and what curriculum we are using




 photo SubscribeButton_zpsdc17ac56.png


Want to see how hundreds of other homeschool families plan their days?  Stop by the iHomeschool Network's Not Back to School blog hop!

Friday, August 23, 2013

Classical Mamas Read - The Well Trained Mind Ch. 15-16

Pin It

This post contains affiliate links to highly recommended products!

Welcome back to Classical Mamas Read!  I'm excited to be back here with you today to discuss chapters 15 and 16 of The Well Trained MindIf you want to take a look back at our previous discussions, click the picture above to take you to a list of each chapter we have talked about.

Reading about the logic stage has been very interesting to me.  It's helping me see some of the reasons behind what we are doing now in the grammar stage.  Have those of you with young children read the logic and rhetoric chapters in this book, or did you stop at the end of the grammar stage section?

Here are some of the quotes and ideas that I found interesting and helpful from the two chapters I read for this week.  As always, the book has numerous suggestions for resources, scheduling, etc. that you are going to want to check out for yourself!


Ch. 15 - The Language of Reason: Math (Logic Stage)


During the logic stage, the study of math goes from arithmetic (mathematical operations such as adding, subtracting, dividing, multiplying, and so on) to mathematics (understanding how numbers relate and why). (pg.252)

  • Along with this transition, comes the transition from the mental mode to the symbolic mode.  Remember in the grammar stage, students begin at the manipulative mode (actually moving objects around to solve problems) and move into the mental mode (being able to picture the objects instead of having to touch them).  The dialectic stage is when they transition into the symbolic mode, which is being able to use abstract numbers and symbols without having to picture them.

  • This transition is usually completed in the 5th-6th grades.

  • The authors are pretty adamant about not letting your children use calculators until this transition is complete.


When do you (or will you) let your children begin using calculators?



  • They recommend including practical, everyday math into your studies.


 What are some of your favorite ways to make math applicable for your logic stage student? 



  • 7th-8th grade is when students will begin upper level math such as algebra and geometry.  The authors suggest that upper level math is good for all students, even those not pursuing mathematical fields.  Here are some of the reasons:
 
    • learning to work with unknowns
    • developing analyzing skills
    • strengthening logic skills
    • In a nut shell, it helps students become better THINKERS, which is helpful in all areas of life.


What do you think about higher math for your children who probably won't go into math related fields?



Ch. 16 - Why 1492?  History and Geography (Logic Stage)


  • In the logic stage, students move from merely memorizing events and hearing relatively isolated stories, to connecting the dots between them. 
 
  • They begin to ask questions to discover what the causes and effects are that string history events into one long story.
 
  •  If it isn't already, the logic stage is when history should really become the backbone that ties all of your other subjects together.
 
  • Assemble a history notebook:
    • Time Line (to see how all events relate to one another)
    • Outline (look past the rhetoric and get to the main point of the text)
    • Evaluating Primary Sources (instead of relying on reading other people's evaluations of events)
    • Organize all the information

How does your logic stage time line look different than your grammar stage time line?


Do you add on to your previous timeline or start a new one?

Do you have a family time line, or does each of your children have their own to add to?


  • The Outline - this is the logic stage counterpart to grammar stage narration, the information is just more complex.
 
    • 5th grade - Write a summary sentence for each paragraph (label with Roman numerals)
 
    • 6th grade - Add supporting points under each summary sentence (A and B under the Roman numerals)
 
    • 7th grade - Add sub points under the supporting points (1 and 2 under each A and B)
 
    • 8th grade - same as 7th

  • Don't forget to tie geography into history!

What does your logic stage history look like?  What resources do you use and what do you expect from your child?


 ______________________________________________________________________________


If you don't have the book already, you can look for it at your library or get it on amazon. (The Well Trained Mind)

If you are behind, feel free to still comment on the previous discussions.  If you want to be emailed when someone makes a comment, make sure to click "Subscribe by Email" right under the comment box (right hand side), so you won't miss out on any discussion!


Classical Mamas Read Link-Up


Did you write about these chapters on your blog?  Have you been reading and blogging about another book (for you, not a children's book)?  Do you have a book club going on at your blog (once again, not for a children's book)?  I'd love for you link up here so we can all be encouraged by each other and maybe find another great book to read!

I think I'm going to keep this link-up ongoing since there aren't going to be a huge number of posts and then anyone new will be able to be encouraged by the other book reading ideas and discussions.  If the number of posts gets too large, I will fix it.

Please note, all posts must be on topic (about a book you are reading) and appropriate (think family friendly).


Pin It

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Freebie! Understanding the Constitution - Book and Study Guide

Pin It

This freebie is from my sponsor Great Homeschool Conventions.


Do you wish you knew more about the constitution?  I know I do!  Well here's your chance.  Great Homeschool Conventions is partnering with the National Center for Life and Liberty to bring you Understanding the Constitution: Ten things Every Citizen Should Know About the Supreme Law of the Land by David C Gibbs III (who will be speaking at all three Great Homeschool Conventions this coming year!) 

About the book (from the GCH website):

 The United States Constitution is the blueprint by which our nation's government is intended to operate.  Yet most Christians, indeed, most citizens, have no idea what the Constitution actually says.  This book provides the basis for Understanding the Constitution and the Bible's role in its development.  The book comes with a Study Guide useful for all ages from teens through adults.  It is recommended for use by homeschoolers, Christian schools and colleges, and youth and adult Sunday School classes.

This looks like a great book for any family, and is especially perfect for homeschool families because you get the study guide along with it!  If you are studying American History this year, make sure you snag this offer before August 28th and use it to supplement your studies!

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Learning History through Song with Veritas Press

Pin It

Last summer my son started asking lots of questions like "What did people do before there were shoes?" and "Where did people live before there were houses?"  That let me know that it was time to start learning history!  Being that I love the classical model of teaching, I knew that I wanted to teach him history chronologically and that I wanted to doing it by reading living books and incorporating memory work.

At the beginning of the year we started out with creation, reading stories, adding events to our timeline, and doing activities that would help him remember what we were learning.  I put the plan together, researching books to read and activities to do.  I love this kind of planning, but I was finding that it honestly just took too much time!  As we were finishing up learning about ancient Egypt, I knew that I wanted to look for another option.


What I Love About Veritas Press History


I looked at many different options and nothing quite fit what I was looking for...until I stumbled across that Veritas Press website!  Their history curriculum looked amazing!  It had all the aspects of studying history that I was looking for:

This post is part of review I have at  The Curriculum Choice.  Head on over to find out all the things I love about Veritas Press history, how we use it in our homeschool, and even a video of my son talking about what he has learned!

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Trivium Tuesdays-Classical Link-Up #71

Pin It



Welcome to another week of Trivium Tuesdays!  For those of you who are new here today, this is a link-up aimed at encouraging and informing other homeschoolers who use the Classical model of teaching.  Here we can share with each other and learn from one another.

I'm still working on transferring the All Things Classical list over to Pinterest.  If you don't follow me over there already, make sure you do so that you can search the boards to find just what you need!  Click on the "P" to follow!


Featured Posts


Last week there were three of you that tied for having the most clicks, so I am going to feature each of you! 




First up is Jessica from My Teacher's Name is Mama.  She shares with us about what she considers when choosing a direction for her little girl's schooling.




Next is Beth from Classical Conversations at Home.  She shares with us what she considers when choosing curriculum...and what she has chosen for this year!



Last is Colleen from Sola Gratia Mom. She shares a great idea for adding in a little geography to your history studies!



This Week's Link-Up


Here are the rules:
  • Your post must have to do (in some way) with classical homeschooling (any age children).
  • Your post may be from your archives as long as you only post it one time on this link-up.
  • Please link to your direct post, not your blog in general.
  • Please place my Trivium Tuesdays button (found on my right sidebar) on your blog post so others can learn about this link-up!
  • It may be helpful to state in your link description what stage of the trivium or what subject your post is about, if applicable, so others can easily find posts they are interested in looking at.
  • Remember, everyone loves comments =) So don't be shy, and tell someone if you liked their post!

I reserve the right to remove any link-up that does not have to do with classical homeschooling.         If you are a regular here at Trivium Tuesdays and have something to share that is a little off topic, but still would be an encouragement to the readers here, please still share it =)  I'm referring to people who are just trying to get their blog more exposure without following the rules above.

I will visit each of your blogs this week and feature my favorite link-up for all to see next week!  Also, if your blog has a button I will place it on my sidebar (under Friends to Visit) for the week until it is replaced by the next week's favorite =)

2013 Homeschool Omnibus - 90 Ebooks

Pin It

Unfortunately this sale is now over, but you can still click on the individual resources below if you are interested in any of them.  The links will take you to various websites/blogs where the products are for sale.

What is an Omnibus anyways?  Essentially, it is a large collection of works from an author or on a particular theme. 

This week, the ladies of the iHomeschool Network are bringing you a Homeschool Omnibus!  We are combining over 90 of our best works and offering them to you for just $25 (that's just a little over 25 cents a piece!)

Have you been eying a particular ebook or curriculum, but weren't sure if you wanted to spend the money?  Well, now is the time!  This incredible sale only happens once a year and will equip you with everything you need to make this school year great!


What's included in the Homeschool Omnibus?


Curriculum




Planners

 



Homeschool Resources and Helps




Literature




Homeschool Encouragement and Information




Encouragement and Ideas for the Home and Family 






Additional Resources: Codes and Links Provided After Purchase

 
  • From Fortuigence: Get kids ready for writing! Grab access to a short online course that supports you in setting a powerful setting for your kids to become strong writers. A $79 value -- yours free!
  • Also from A+ TutorSoft: download a free ($21.99 value) math supplement that helps to build a strong foundation and close learning gaps for struggling students.
  • From Kirsten Joy Awake: Download a free copy of Bible Writer: Volume 1, an all in one Bible Memory and Copywork curriculum.
__________________________________________________________________________


Isn't this an incredible collection of books?  For $25 it's a deal that you don't want to miss!  You can get this bundle THIS WEEK ONLY! (Until Sunday, August 25th)

Any other questions?  Visit the FAQ page at HomeschoolOmnibus.com



Monday, August 19, 2013

Meet the Students! 2013-2014 edition

You've seen what curriculum we will be using this year, now it's time to meet the students!  This is a special year, because it is my first time with a real, school aged student.  Technically, up until now, it has just been preschool.  Today my son turns 5, so this is officially our kindergarten year.  Not much is practically changing, but it does add a little weight to how I think about this year. 

Enough about that, though...here are the kiddos!



Name: Mackenzie

 

Age: 3

 

Favorite Things: 


Drawing and all things crafty,

Gymnastics,

Dancing around the house like a "ballet girl"

Anything pink or princess




Name: Trevor

 

Age: 5

 

Favorite Things:  


Riding his bike,

  Reading,

 Figuring out how things work,
 
 Running and jumping and all things boy!



Want to see how they've grown since last year?  Check out my 2012-2013 Meet the Students post!  I just took a minute to read what I had wrote last year and I pretty much could have copied and pasted the same things here.  Funny how their basic interests and inclinations stay the same.

I'm excited to see how they learn and grow this coming year!  Who are your students this year?  Share in the comments or link up to the Not Back to School hop!

You can meet hundreds of other homeschool students by visiting iHomeschool Network's Not Back to School blog hop!


Pin It

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Trivium Tuesdays-Classical Link-Up #70

Pin It



Welcome to another week of Trivium Tuesdays!  For those of you who are new here today, this is a link-up aimed at encouraging and informing other homeschoolers who use the Classical model of teaching.  Here we can share with each other and learn from one another.

I'm still working on transferring the All Things Classical list over to Pinterest.  If you don't follow me over there already, make sure you do so that you can search the boards to find just what you need!  Click on the "P" to follow!


Featured Post


Gena, over at I Choose Joy, shared a documentary with us last week about children and the media.  This topic always intrigues me.  I really don't mind the idea of electronics, but I always end up hating how my kids act after using them...and how much they really, really want to use them!  My husband and I actually just took our TV downstairs this afternoon.  We really don't watch much except DVDs (well, the kids watch PBS, but that might have to stop if our one rabbit eat won't pick up the station down there!), so it's not actually going to change our viewing habits.  Mainly, we are hoping that it will be "out of sight, out of mind" for the kids.  We will see how it  goes!


Most Clicked on Post from Last Week


The most visited from last week was Dianna, from The Kennedy Adventures, sharing her curriculum pics for the new school year.  Actually all of the curriculum pick posts got a lot of clicks last week.  It's that time of year, of course!


This Week's Link-Up


Here are the rules:
  • Your post must have to do (in some way) with classical homeschooling (any age children).
  • Your post may be from your archives as long as you only post it one time on this link-up.
  • Please link to your direct post, not your blog in general.
  • Please place my Trivium Tuesdays button (found on my right sidebar) on your blog post so others can learn about this link-up!
  • It may be helpful to state in your link description what stage of the trivium or what subject your post is about, if applicable, so others can easily find posts they are interested in looking at.
  • Remember, everyone loves comments =) So don't be shy, and tell someone if you liked their post!

I reserve the right to remove any link-up that does not have to do with classical homeschooling.         If you are a regular here at Trivium Tuesdays and have something to share that is a little off topic, but still would be an encouragement to the readers here, please still share it =)  I'm referring to people who are just trying to get their blog more exposure without following the rules above.

I will visit each of your blogs this week and feature my favorite link-up for all to see next week!  Also, if your blog has a button I will place it on my sidebar (under Friends to Visit) for the week until it is replaced by the next week's favorite =)


Pin It

Monday, August 12, 2013

Homeschooling Day by Day

Homeschooling Day by Day: Encouragement and Ideas for everyone!
Pin It

If you've ever wished for a homeschooling manual- or better yet, a mentor- I think you'll love Homeschooling Day by Day!

 

Buy the ebook for just $4.99!

 

 

This ebook is the collaborate work of eleven mothers who, like you, are in the trenches raising and educating their children at home.  {Read the author profiles here}

 

     
"If you are considering homeschooling or are a veteran of 20 years, if you're excited about the upcoming school year or fearful and dreading it, this book will speak to and encourage you!" -Gena Mayo, I Choose Joy!
     

 

Throughout the forty chapters of Homeschooling Day by Day, you'll read about:

 
  • homeschooling methods
 
  • learning styles
 
  • homeschooling kids with learning disabilities
 
  • homeschooling teenagers, preschoolers, and how to juggle multiple ages
 
  • dealing with insecurity and criticism as a homeschool mom
 
  • how to handle bad attitudes, and expectations
 
  • hands on help for lesson planning, keeping up with housework and meals 

  • so much more!
 

 

{Take a peek at the Table of Contents or read sneak peaks into some of the chapters!}

     

Homeschooling Day by Day is an outpouring of Godly encouragement that will sustain you on the dry and weary days- Jamerrill Stewart, Holy Spirit Led Homeschooling
 

   

If you’re a homeschool mom in need of a little inspiration, or if you’ve ever considered homeschooling but aren’t quite sure you can do it, Homeschooling Day by Day will encourage and empower you!

   

Homeschooling Day by Day - Encouragement and Ideas for Everyone!
 

You can purchase Homeschooling Day by Day for your Kindle or home computer for just $4.99!

   

   

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Trivium Tuesdays-Classical Link-Up #69

Pin It



Welcome to another week of Trivium Tuesdays!  For those of you who are new here today, this is a link-up aimed at encouraging and informing other homeschoolers who use the Classical model of teaching.  Here we can share with each other and learn from one another.

I'm still working on transferring the All Things Classical list over to Pinterest.  If you don't follow me over there already, make sure you do so that you can search the boards to find just what you need!  Click on the "P" to follow!


Featured Post


Sola Gratia Mom shared last week about an Egyptian party they had.  What I loved most was her idea of having the kids make costumes right at the party!  Sometimes parents and kids can get overwhelmed trying to think of (and make/buy) costumes, especially for themed parties, so what a great idea to have the supplies ready right at the party!  It also provides one of the activities =) 


Most Clicked on Post from Last Week


One of my favorites from last week was Keeping it Simple, from Rachel's Reflections.  I'm so glad that you all like it too!  It was by far the most clicked on post from last week!  Head on over if you want some great ideas and encouragement for planning your homeschool year.


This Week's Link-Up


Here are the rules:
  • Your post must have to do (in some way) with classical homeschooling (any age children).
  • Your post may be from your archives as long as you only post it one time on this link-up.
  • Please link to your direct post, not your blog in general.
  • Please place my Trivium Tuesdays button (found on my right sidebar) on your blog post so others can learn about this link-up!
  • It may be helpful to state in your link description what stage of the trivium or what subject your post is about, if applicable, so others can easily find posts they are interested in looking at.
  • Remember, everyone loves comments =) So don't be shy, and tell someone if you liked their post!

I reserve the right to remove any link-up that does not have to do with classical homeschooling.         If you are a regular here at Trivium Tuesdays and have something to share that is a little off topic, but still would be an encouragement to the readers here, please still share it =)  I'm referring to people who are just trying to get their blog more exposure without following the rules above.

I will visit each of your blogs this week and feature my favorite link-up for all to see next week!  Also, if your blog has a button I will place it on my sidebar (under Friends to Visit) for the week until it is replaced by the next week's favorite =)

Pin It