Friday, March 28, 2014

10 Things To Do With Your Child Before Age 10 - Ch. 11 Teaching the Trivium

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This post contains an affiliate link to the book that we are going through.

Welcome to another week of the Teaching the Trivium book club!  I am so excited to be reading and discussing this book along with you.  I loved the discussion last week and would love to hear from more of you! 

This week is going to be a bit different.  See, last year I did a whole series on this chapter.  At that time I didn't even realize that it was a chapter from Teaching the Trivium, because the Bluedorn's have it on their website, Trivium Pursuit.  I took each of the "10 Things" and wrote a post on it.  Then later I wrote a second post, following up to see how I was doing at implementing that thing.

I'm going to link here to each of those posts for you to browse through as you wish.  Feel free to join the discussion by commenting on this post or on any of posts below.


















Thanks for reading along this week!  Leave comments here on the blog post, or share about it on social media (#ClassicalMamasRead).  I'll be sharing too, so follow me on facebook, twitter, or google+ and we can chat about it there as well!  Don't forget, if you want to share your thoughts about Teaching the Trivium on your own blog, link it up below so we can all come and visit!


Next week we will be talking about chapter twelve of Teaching the Trivium.  If you haven't gotten your own copy yet, make sure you check your library or order one soon so you can be ready for next time!  Also, this is a 600+ page book, so I am only touching on certain points of each chapter.  There is so much great information that I am not covering, so if this discussion interests you, you are going to want to make sure to pick up your own copy so you can read more!



Classical Mamas Read Link-Up



Did you write about Teaching the Trivium on your blog?  Have you been reading and blogging about another book (for you, not a children's book)?  Do you have a book club going on at your blog (once again, not for a children's book)?  I'd love for you link up here so we can all be encouraged by each other and maybe find another great book to read!

I think I'm going to keep this link-up ongoing since there aren't going to be a huge number of posts and then anyone new will be able to be encouraged by the other book reading ideas and discussions.  If the number of posts gets too large, I will fix it.

Please note, all posts must be on topic (about a book you are reading) and appropriate (think family friendly).


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Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Kindergarten Saxon Math Review

Saxon k Title Pic
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I have a 5 year old and a 3 year old and at the turn of the year I was feeling like I wanted to change up our math routine a bit. We have been using Ray's Arithmetic and it has provided my son with a fantastic understanding of how addition and subtraction works. We are still using Ray's a couple days a week, but I wanted to incorporate something that would also provide practice in some classic kindergarten type skills (patterns, basic measuring, calendar reading, etc.) After consulting a few classical homeschooling references, I decided to give Saxon a try. They said that the kindergarten curriculum was more on the preschool level, but because I wanted to use it with both my 3 and 5 year olds, I thought it would be just right for us. I was right!

Come read my full review at The Curriculum Choice!


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Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Trivium Tuesdays - Classical Link-Up #100


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Welcome to another week of Trivium Tuesdays!  For those of you who are new here today, this is a link-up aimed at encouraging and informing other homeschoolers who use the Classical model of teaching.  Here we can share with each other and learn from one another.




Don't forget to follow my Pinterest boards that are a part of the All Things Classical List!

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Also, please remember to only link up posts that have to do with homeschooling using the classical model of education.  Thank you for understanding this link-up's theme.



Featured Post from Last Week



Do you have a quiet time in your home each day?  I think quiet time is completely necessary for everyone involved =)  For me, it's when I do my blogging and everything related to that.  My son reads and plays quietly and my daughter still naps.  I love these ideas that Sara gives for activities to do during quiet time.


Your Favorite From Last Week


Everyone loves a good book list!  Well, I do.. and so do many of you because 101 Chapter Books to Read Aloud to My Kids from Learners in Bloom was the most clicked on link from last week!  Thanks for sharing =)


This Week's Link-Up


Here are the rules:
  • Your post must have to do (in some way) with classical homeschooling (any age children).
  • Your post may be from your archives as long as you only post it one time on this link-up.
  • Please link to your direct post, not your blog in general.
  • Please place my Trivium Tuesdays button (found on my right sidebar) on your blog post so others can learn about this link-up!
  • It may be helpful to state in your link description what stage of the trivium or what subject your post is about, if applicable, so others can easily find posts they are interested in looking at.
  • Remember, everyone loves comments =) So don't be shy, and tell someone if you liked their post!


I reserve the right to remove any link-up that does not have to do with classical homeschooling.         

If you are a regular here at Trivium Tuesdays and have something to share that is a little off topic, but still would be an encouragement to the readers here, please still share it =)  I'm referring to people who are just trying to get their blog more exposure without following the rules above.

I will visit each of your blogs this week and feature my favorite link-up for all to see next week!  Also, if your blog has a button I will place it on my sidebar (under Friends to Visit) for the week until it is replaced by the next week's favorite =)

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Monday, March 24, 2014

Trace and Build Numbers

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These Trace and Build Numbers are designed to complement the A-Z Trace and Build Letters.

Let your preschooler discover what types of lines it takes to build the numbers 1-10.  These pages are to be printed out for your child to use.  I recommend laminating these pages, not only for durability, but also for repeated use as dry erase templates.  

Included are both the number pages and the pieces needed to build each number.



Download


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Friday, March 21, 2014

Different Methods of Homeschooling in Light of the Trivium

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This post contains an affiliate link to the book that we are going through.

Welcome to another week of the Teaching the Trivium book club!  I am so excited to read and discuss this book along with you.  I loved the discussion last week and would love to hear from more of you!  Today we talk about homeschooling methods.


Chapter 10 - Different Methods and Approaches to Homeschooling in Light of the Trivium


Today we are talking about how you can apply the principles of the trivium to different homeschooling methods.  Honestly I had never really though about applying the trivium outside of the classical model before.  This chapter was very interesting to me!

First, the Bluedorns go through six different general homeschooling methods and evaluate how the principles of the trivium would fit with each of them.  Here are the six methods:

  1. Scope and Sequence Method
  2. Charlotte Mason Method
  3. Unschooling Method
  4. The Unit Study Approach
  5. The Formal Classical Approach
  6. The Principle Approach

I'm not going to go through each of them.  I'm mostly going to talk about the Charlotte Mason method, just because it has always had a place in the back of my mind.  I really like the gentle manor of that method and it does me well to strive for it =)  If you want to talk about any of the other methods, either write up a post and link it at the end, or leave a comment and we can all chat more there!




Are you a true classical educator or do you take more of the applied trivium approach to another method?





The Charlotte Mason Method and the Trivium


When I think of the Charlotte Mason method of homeschooling, I always see the similarities to classical homeschooling.  Thanks to the Bluedorns, now I see that it has a lot to do with how it easily applies the principles of the trivium, and not necessarily because it is strictly classical in nature.

Both methods like to study history chronologically and understand subjects in a logical sequence.  Both methods use narration, copywork, living books, and desire to create in their students a love of learning (leading to self-education).

They differ fairly greatly in the grammar stage.  The classical model sees a child's great ability to absorb information and requires lots of memorization in the early years.  The Charlotte Mason method takes a much gentler approach to the early years, focusing on training in habits, self-control, character, etc.

Honestly, I think both are true =)  The main problem for me is that there are only so many hours in the day.  I love seeing my children memorize incredible amounts of information, but going through our memory box takes up a chunk of our homeschool day.  I deeply desire to train my children in the ways of Charlotte Mason, but shamefully I am not always consistent with my efforts.  I am hoping to be more purposeful with that this summer.  Maybe I'll call it the Charlotte Mason Summer!

For the most part, the Habitual Method of Charlotte Mason and the Applied Trivium fit together quite well.  They complement and reinforce each other.  When combined, they enrich the homeschool experience.   pg.281


Formal Versus Non-Formal Early Academics


The last part of the chapter is spent talking about delayed formal academics.  This is where I believe the Bluedorns stray from the traditional path of classical education.  I understand now why they say that the approach they prescribe is the applied trivium, not so much the formal classical method. Their approach on this topic lines up more closely with the Charlotte Mason method.  This is also why their suggested ages in past chapters have seemed a little behind compared to other classical sources that I have read.

I am certainly not a professional, but I do have lots of thoughts and questions about this topic.  I see children as young as preschool age with amazing capacities to learn.  My thought thus far has been "why waste this!"  Both of my kids started reading at age 3 and having regular school times then too.  That being said, the lessons are not long and I wouldn't consider them 'formal' like traditional school.  I can't imagine not continuing to fill them with information as they increase in abilities.

The Bluedorns talk about the importance of instilling a good moral foundation in the early years.  They say that foundation will lead to a more productive academic future.  I completely agree.  We emphasize this in my home from toddler age up.  It is hard to be consistent, though, and I am happy to be encouraged to work hard at it!

They also talk about how early academics can cause problems in a child's brain.  This worries me a little bit!

We emphasize that the physical properties of the brain should be fully developed before engaging in those activities which place stress on those properties.

I don't think I've really heard anyone talk like this before.  How are you to know when your child's brain is developed in different areas?  Can anyone shed any light on this topic?

The Bluedorns said two things that were directed right at me.  First, that parents "may expect their children to perform at adult levels of ability." (pg 291)  I certainly don't mean to to this to my children, but I know that I have caught myself thinking this way before.

Secondly, "they may simply be trying to find ways to keep the curious little rascals plenty busy and out of trouble." (pg 291)  This was the case with my first born.  From baby on up, he was not one to entertain himself or to be happy in an imaginary world.  He needed my presence and direction in order to be content.  That is why I started set preschool times with him at age 2.  My daughter is completely the opposite.  From the time she was a baby, she has been able to happily entertain herself.  She loves to sit for an hour making cards or coloring pictures.  She will play in her room with her play kitchen or dressing up.  I've said many times that if she was my firstborn, I probably wouldn't have started any formal type school time until she was in kindergarten.



What do you think about delayed formal education?

How do you apply that concept to your homeschool?





I think what I need to keep in mind is this (pg 292):

"Never discourage a child from learning, but neither should we over press academics to the point of strain or exasperation." 





Thanks for reading along this week!  Leave comments here on the blog post, or share about it on social media (#ClassicalMamasRead).  I'll be sharing too, so follow me on facebook, twitter, or google+ and we can chat about it there as well!  Don't forget, if you want to share your thoughts about Teaching the Trivium on your own blog, link it up below so we can all come and visit!


Next week we will be talking about chapter eleven of Teaching the Trivium.  If you haven't gotten your own copy yet, make sure you check your library or order one soon so you can be ready for next time!  Also, this is a 600+ page book, so I am only touching on certain points of each chapter.  There is so much great information that I am not covering, so if this discussion interests you, you are going to want to make sure to pick up your own copy so you can read more!



Classical Mamas Read Link-Up



Did you write about Teaching the Trivium on your blog?  Have you been reading and blogging about another book (for you, not a children's book)?  Do you have a book club going on at your blog (once again, not for a children's book)?  I'd love for you link up here so we can all be encouraged by each other and maybe find another great book to read!

I think I'm going to keep this link-up ongoing since there aren't going to be a huge number of posts and then anyone new will be able to be encouraged by the other book reading ideas and discussions.  If the number of posts gets too large, I will fix it.

Please note, all posts must be on topic (about a book you are reading) and appropriate (think family friendly).


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Thursday, March 20, 2014

Bringing Order Back to My Life with Paperless Home Organization

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I am excited to share with you this post about one of my new sponsors, Simply Convivial!

I am a very organized person, or at least I'd like to think that I am.  The truth is that since I had my first child, my planning turned more into a survival mode.  I love to plan and I used to thrive on being organized.  These past few years, I have just been doing things as I can, hoping it all gets done, and crossing my fingers that I'm not forgetting anything.

My husband is super easy going and really never complains, but when he starts organizing the basement on a Saturday or asking if we could have a better system for something, I feel like I'm letting him down.  At the same time, though, I know that I'm doing all that I can.  I'm not trying to say that every wife should have her home and everything in her life perfectly organized, but I am keenly aware that I deeply desire organization back in my life.

This picture is of me back in the days when I was organized =)  Just a happy, young girl at her wedding shower, excited to begin organizing her own home!  What nice memories!

About two months ago, Mystie from Simply Convivial introduced me to her ebooks GTD for Homemakers and Paperless Home Organization.  I thought they might give me some ideas, tools, or maybe even just a little inspiration to get organized again.  Boy was I right!  These books did all three!  I read both of them all the way through and plan on going through them again (which is a mark to me that a book is really worthwhile =)




These books are filled with really helpful information, not just fluff that you already know.  GTD for Homemakers is the why part of the duo and Paperless Home Organization is the how.  Well, I guess GTD for Homemakers has a lot of how in it too, but Paperless Home Organization really takes your hand and walks you step-by-step through setting up a complete organizational system on your computer (or other electronic device).

The goal of Mystie's books is to help you be able to enjoy what is presently going on in your life by not being mentally drained thinking of all the things you need to in the future.  The point is to get it all out of your head so that you are not thinking about it.  If you have it organized outside of your head, you can rest easy.  At the same time you can be confident that you are not forgetting anything.

It's funny, because as I read and reflected on these books I recalled that this is exactly how I used to function (pre-kids)!  I literally remember telling people who asked me about something coming up, "I have no idea, but I can find it out for you in just a second."  I used to practice these principles and I am happy that I am beginning to practice them again =)


"Defining my work appeals most to me, yet doing predefined work is what eludes me most." (GTD for Homemakers pg 11)


This is exactly me, and when I read this I knew that this book would be helpful!  I love to plan and make lists, but it's the doing of the work that is the tricky part =)


"As you go along, remember to just do anything that will take you less than two minutes to do." (GTD for Homemakers pg 36)


I thought this was a great tip!  If you have something that can be done quickly, it will take you less time to just do it than it would do write it down, think about it, decide when to do it, etc.


My Life Before Reading Paperless Home Organization


  • Dirty dishes in the sink at all times...enough to do another whole load
  • Always playing catch up with the laundry
  • Feeling overwhelmed by the thousand thoughts swimming in my head
  • Often forgetting things
  • Feeling like I would be embarrassed if someone stopped by my house without giving notice
  • Frustrated that there just aren't enough hours in the day


My Life After Reading Paperless Home Organization


  • Satisfied with the few dishes that might be in the sink at any given time
  • Literally not having any laundry to do one day...it was all done!
  • Being able to focus on one task at a time, knowing that the next thing to do is written down and waiting for me later
  • Feeling confident that we could be ready for visitors with just a quick 15 minute go-over of the house
  • Having my husband say to me, "You should really write those ideas down." and being able to respond, "I already have!"
  • Looking at my husband one Saturday and actually saying, "I sort of feel bored." Then he reminded me that it was just about dinner time ;)  


The great thing about the ideas in these books is that you will benefit even if you only implement one or two of them.  Then as you settle on those new processes, give one of the books a look through again and find the next easy idea to apply.  That is exactly where I am.  I am really happy with the way things are going, but I'm sure that I didn't catch everything the first time through and I know that there are more ways that I can be using the system to increase my organization.  I'm excited to read through them again!

This week only, you can get Paperless Home Organization and almost 100 other resources as a part of the Ultimate Homemaking Bundle!  






If you are feeling stressed out with all that is going on in your life, if your mind is swimming with a hundred things at any given moment, or if you just feel like you could use a better system for keeping track of everything, I highly encourage you to get these books.

You can get GTD for Homemakers or Paperless Home Organization for just $4.99 each.  I recommend starting with GTD for Homemakers if you need a new mindset about keeping organized.  If you just need the help understanding how to make your computer/smartphone really help you in the process, you might be able to go right to Paperless Home Organization.

I hope that you will soon be on a journey to a more peaceful, satisfying, organized life!

Purchase Now or Learn More!


GTD for Homemakers

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Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Trivium Tuesdays - Classical Link-Up #99


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Welcome to another week of Trivium Tuesdays!  For those of you who are new here today, this is a link-up aimed at encouraging and informing other homeschoolers who use the Classical model of teaching.  Here we can share with each other and learn from one another.




Don't forget to follow my Pinterest boards that are a part of the All Things Classical List!

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Also, please remember to only link up posts that have to do with homeschooling using the classical model of education.  Thank you for understanding this link-up's theme.



Featured Post from Last Week



Last week, Mary (from Homegrown Learners) shared a podcast that she was interviewed on.  The topic is Would Classical Conversations Be A Good Fit For Your Family?  If you have ever considered joining Classical Conversations, take a minute to listen.  You'll be glad you did!


Most Clicked on Post From Last Week


Tonia got the most clicks last week with her post 2nd Grade Homeschool with The Well-Trained Mind.  Lots of great ideas if you have a lower elementary student! 



This Week's Link-Up


Here are the rules:
  • Your post must have to do (in some way) with classical homeschooling (any age children).
  • Your post may be from your archives as long as you only post it one time on this link-up.
  • Please link to your direct post, not your blog in general.
  • Please place my Trivium Tuesdays button (found on my right sidebar) on your blog post so others can learn about this link-up!
  • It may be helpful to state in your link description what stage of the trivium or what subject your post is about, if applicable, so others can easily find posts they are interested in looking at.
  • Remember, everyone loves comments =) So don't be shy, and tell someone if you liked their post!


I reserve the right to remove any link-up that does not have to do with classical homeschooling.         

If you are a regular here at Trivium Tuesdays and have something to share that is a little off topic, but still would be an encouragement to the readers here, please still share it =)  I'm referring to people who are just trying to get their blog more exposure without following the rules above.

I will visit each of your blogs this week and feature my favorite link-up for all to see next week!  Also, if your blog has a button I will place it on my sidebar (under Friends to Visit) for the week until it is replaced by the next week's favorite =)

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Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Trivium Tuesdays - Classical Link-Up #98


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Welcome to another week of Trivium Tuesdays!  For those of you who are new here today, this is a link-up aimed at encouraging and informing other homeschoolers who use the Classical model of teaching.  Here we can share with each other and learn from one another.




Don't forget to follow my Pinterest boards that are a part of the All Things Classical List!

 photo AllThingsClassical-titlepic_zps4a3485e7.png


Also, please remember to only link up posts that have to do with homeschooling using the classical model of education.  Thank you for understanding this link-up's theme.



Featured Post from Last Week



Melody was talking specifically about Wagner last week, but she shares so many great resources that will benefit whatever composer you are studying.  Check it out!


Most Clicked on Post from Last Week


Everyone is always curious about how other people schedule their days, so it's no wonder that Joanna's post Sample Homeschool Schedule was the most clicked last week!  The post is so much more than just a schedule, though, so I encourage you to check it out!


This Week's Link-Up


Here are the rules:
  • Your post must have to do (in some way) with classical homeschooling (any age children).
  • Your post may be from your archives as long as you only post it one time on this link-up.
  • Please link to your direct post, not your blog in general.
  • Please place my Trivium Tuesdays button (found on my right sidebar) on your blog post so others can learn about this link-up!
  • It may be helpful to state in your link description what stage of the trivium or what subject your post is about, if applicable, so others can easily find posts they are interested in looking at.
  • Remember, everyone loves comments =) So don't be shy, and tell someone if you liked their post!


I reserve the right to remove any link-up that does not have to do with classical homeschooling.         

If you are a regular here at Trivium Tuesdays and have something to share that is a little off topic, but still would be an encouragement to the readers here, please still share it =)  I'm referring to people who are just trying to get their blog more exposure without following the rules above.

I will visit each of your blogs this week and feature my favorite link-up for all to see next week!  Also, if your blog has a button I will place it on my sidebar (under Friends to Visit) for the week until it is replaced by the next week's favorite =)

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Monday, March 10, 2014

Classical Mamas Read - Book List

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Classical Mamas Read is a book club here at Living and Learning at Home where we read through books that are especially beneficial for classically homeschooling families.  We go through each book chapter by chapter and discuss them together.  If you are currently reading any of these books, I would love for you to jump in a join the discussion!  These are ongoing conversations for the encouragement of like-minded families!

 Here are the books we have gone through in the Classical Mamas Read series.


Buy on AmazonBuy on AmazonBuy on AmazonBuy on Amazon
Go to DiscussionGo to DiscussionGo To DiscussionGo to Discussion


Do you have a book you would like to go through as a part of the Classical Mamas Read series?  Let me know!


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